100 Days of Yoga, Day 48

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October 8, 2012 by blogmasterjdeam

“We can struggle with what is.  We can judge and blame others or ourselves.  Or we can accept what cannot be changed.  Peace comes from an honorable and open heart accepting what is true.

Do you want to remain stuck?  Or to release the fearful sense of self and rest kindly where we are?”

~ Jack Kornfield

I have a very, very blessed life.  I don’t know why it worked out this way for me, but I am truly grateful.  The money I’ve acquired brings me the most happiness when I share it with others.

I recently received an email, which suggests that with all the things I’ve acquired, with my good health, the good health of my family, etcetera, I have no reason to be unhappy, thus no reason to seek happiness.  And further, if I am unhappy with all I have, what hope is there for the other 99.99%?  Although this was a private, not public, post, there are some things I need to address, because the writer brings up some points perhaps others have thought and not expressed.

First of all, if you have the opportunity, please watch the George Harrison biopic: LIVING IN THE MATERIAL WORLD.

It explains, quite well, the path I am on.

Secondly,  I don’t think there is a “us” and “them” concept.  There is only US.  We are all in this world together, doing the very best we can.  We are like a jigsaw puzzle: all pieces fitting together to make the whole.

And finally, from Matthew 26:11 “… the poor you will always have with you … ”

Why some people have money and others don’t; why sadness, grief, loss come to some doors, but not others, is one of life’s great mysteries.  We could call it karma, but then that implies a sense of right or wrong, and it is not for me to use that definition to describe any being, including myself.  I think few, if any of us, have a clear enough understanding of karma that we can apply it to anyone’s life.  When people tell me I deserve what I have because I’ve worked hard, I say bullshit — we’ve all worked hard and we all deserve abundance.  Why is it not so?

In Buddhism, it is believed life is made of equal parts sorrow and equal parts joy.  I can see in hindsight, however, even the sorrow was joy.  Out of every great sadness, also came a joy: the death of a loved one, the birth of a new being.  Like the seasons, our lives are in a state of constant change.

 

So ultimately, all any of us has is this one moment.  All is transitory.  If you build your happiness on wealth, children, grandchildren or other factors outside yourself, you have a happiness built on sand: if will constantly shift with the prevailing winds.  If we are to get out of this predicament in one piece, our lives cannot be built on sand.  That is what this work is.

“YOUR TASK IS NOT TO SEEK FOR LOVE,

BUT MERELY TO SEEK AND FIND

ALL THE BOUNDARIES WITHIN YOURSELF

THAT  YOU HAVE BUILT AGAINST IT.”

~ RUMI

Here is a lovely guided meditation (by the very amazing Sharon Salzberg) on loving kindness:


MAY ALL BEINGS BE FILLED WITH KINDNESS AND COMPASSION FOR ONE ANOTHER, Chris

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